Home > Maintenance > Keeping Toys in Great Working Order

Keeping Toys in Great Working Order

By: Sarah Clark (ILEX) - Updated: 4 Apr 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Toy Storage Toy Box Wipe Clean Surface

You’ve picked the right age appropriate and safe toys for your children, which is a start – but kids will be kids and it’s important that you keep a close eye on what they are actually doing with their new toys, and carry out regular cleaning, maintenance and toy checks to keep their possessions as safe as you can.

What Are The Everyday Toy Checks I Should Do?

  • Make sure that younger children don’t get their hands on toys not intended for them. Be careful with toys for children under three and check warning labels to make sure they are suitable.
  • Check toys regularly for any small parts that might be coming loose, hair that’s falling out and sharp edges and points. Check wooden toys for splinters and tough edges that could catch.
  • Check toys on a regular basis for signs of damage, wear and tear, and repair or dispose of any damaged toys as soon as you can. Don’t let children carry on playing with toys that are broken, no matter how much they protest!
  • Always follow the instructions and warnings provided with toys and teach your children to do the same as they get older. Make sure that all children are aware of safe toy storage, too.

Toy Checks For Electrical and Battery Operated Toys

Many toys come with batteries these days, and they are usually safe and easy to maintain. But make sure that they are used correctly and carry out toy checks to make sure they aren’t leaking or damaged.

When you’re changing the batteries in children’s toys, always use the same type of battery and don’t just replace one – replace them all. Make sure that when a battery is spent, you remove it straight away.

Small batteries like the mercury disc batteries used in some electronic games can be hazardous for little children who like to put everything in their mouths. If a small child swallows a small battery it could be poisonous, or they could choke, so don’t leave batteries lying around. Make sure that you tell the children never to put batteries into their mouths, ears or noses.

Toy Storage Options – Keeping Toys Safe

  • If you teach your children to take care of their toys, it will serve two purposes – keeping the children safe and keeping the house tidy! Make it easy for kids to put their things away in a toy box or elsewhere by providing them with lots of brightly coloured and easy to reach toy storage areas.
  • Transparent plastic boxes like old ice cream containers or even lunchboxes make ideal toy storage containers for any toys with small parts like Lego and puzzles.
  • Give the children their own large toy storage box, maybe let them help choose, build and customise it so that they enjoy using their very own personal toy box.
  • A plastic hang-up shoe holder is ideal toy storage for small soft toys and items that might get lost at the bottom of a larger toy box. Hang it somewhere the little ones can reach it, like the back of a bedroom door, and encourage them to tidy their teddies into it. You can also hang simple netting on doors and bedroom walls which are ideal for holding larger soft toys and bulky items that aren't too heavy. This keeps the toys visible but off the floor and stored neatly.
  • Trunks, and old boxes or chests are great for keeping dressing up clothes and accessories in.

Teaching Children to Look After and Clean Their Toys

Toys, especially the better loved ones, will occasionally need a wash. Try to buy toys that can be easily washed, for example those with a wipe clean surface or toys that can be washed in a machine.

Encourage the children to help clean their own toys – it’s easy to get them involved with anything that has an easy, wipe clean surface, and they can watch you cleaning it first. Add some gentle disinfectant to a bowl of warm water and this should be enough for most plastic or wooden toys.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
Hydgov - Your Question:
Hello.I want to make fabric books for children possibly with interactive felt parts for example a flower seller fabric picture with flowers children can place on a felt garden cloth inside the book or incorporated in the book. Does this need to be ce. Also if not interactive but just a fabric story book would this come under toys or books as far as regulations go? Many thanks in advance for advice.

Our Response:
Yes it would need to display the CE mark and have been tested accordingly.
ToysAdvice - 6-Apr-17 @ 10:55 AM
Hello.I want to make fabric books for children possibly with interactive felt parts for example a flower seller fabric picture with flowers children can place on a felt garden cloth inside the book or incorporated in the book. Does this need to be ce. Also if not interactive but just a fabric story book would this come under toys or books as far as regulations go? Many thanks in advance for advice .
Hydgov - 4-Apr-17 @ 5:03 PM
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice...
Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Latest Comments
  • KateD
    Re: Toy Safety Standards in the UK
    Hi, I would like to get into crafting to sell. Would the following items need to be CE testEd? Canvas Bags, Paper bunting and…
    12 October 2019
  • Steve
    Re: A Guide to Toy Hygiene
    I have a Teddy Bear of 45 plus years and have been told that by freezing Ted will clean him Is this true? Kind regards. Stephen.
    10 October 2019
  • Missmonty80
    Re: Toy Safety Standards in the UK
    Hi. I am looking into making chewelry for children with the tendency to chew clothing. They will be made only of recycled tshirt…
    5 October 2019
  • Cal
    Re: Toy Safety Standards in the UK
    Can anyone tell me the toxitity of fabric paint specifically glow in the dark.
    24 September 2019
  • Vixpost
    Re: What is This Toy Safety Mark?
    I would like to sell reward charts with stickers, the reward charts would be my design. Other products would be flash cards…
    17 September 2019
  • Didi
    Re: Toys: What Are My Consumer Rights?
    I bought a puppy toy for my seven month old puppy. Within 20 minutes my puppy had managed to chew the teething ring on the…
    9 September 2019
  • Loumeg123
    Re: Toy Safety Standards in the UK
    Hi, I am looking to handmake and sell Taggie blankets for children. I don’t class these as a toy but now am unsure whether they…
    31 August 2019
  • Claire Grant
    Re: Toy Safety Standards in the UK
    What is the legal requirement for ribbon length on a babies toy?
    24 August 2019
  • CoM
    Re: Toy Safety Standards in the UK
    Hi, I have a product - memory cards for children aged 2 - 4 for their early development. The set is basically for the parents…
    16 August 2019
  • ali
    Re: Toy Safety Standards in the UK
    does anyone know if crochet water balloons need ce testing I cant find any information I know handmade sporting goods don't but…
    9 August 2019